The Big Banks Want You Back – Don’t Go!

March 16, 2010 at 6:15 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

The big, “too big to fail” banks are getting worried. There is a movement afoot to convince depositors to switch their accounts to smaller, neighborhood banks or credit unions. In this way, we can hit back at the banksters whose greed & incompetence ran our economy into the ditch and keeps it there. And we can back local financial institutions that refused to join the flim-flammery.

The movement is having an effect or at least the banksters are afraid it will. How do we know? Because they are fighting back the only way they can without really changing their ways. Recent commercials are portraying the behemoth banks as friendly, community banks that you can love. These advertisements play to our American gullibility that still doesn’t mentally grasp commercials as a load of bovine excrement.

Nearly twenty years ago I chuckled in agreement as I read the humor-book, “Dave Barry Does Japan.” The famous satirist said something much like that, in contrast to Japan, the only thing big American companies are still particularly good at is making commercials about how great their products or services are. I had long noticed the disconnect between our real world versus commercials with smiling, dancing fast-food cashiers, helpful pharmacists who come out from behind the counter to offer advice, folksy appliance repairmen, or seasoned, insightful stock brokers all embraced by a company that supports its workers in their dedication to the customer. Does any of that sound like a big-business you’ve dealt with lately? I didn’t think so.

The mega-corporations long ago sped past the point of providing consumers with helpful information to make informed choices. For a long, long time they have used commercials as “bait-and-switch.” They use the screen to show you high-quality products, easy use, and concerned, human customer-service. What they give you is flimsy crap, confusing & complex instructions, and impersonal, off-shored, aggravating service departments.

After 100+ years of exposure to advertising, why do most Americans still fall for it? Every time you see an advertisement of any kind:

Look for the fine print so you know what you are getting. There is usually a “catch.” And remember that in automobile ads and the like, when an announcer comes on to speed-read you the “disclaimer” what it really means is that most everything in the preceding ad was a lie! (Note- the definition of “disclaimer” is “a repudiation of responsibility or connection.” That means everything they just told you was a lie!)

During the ad, keep repeating to yourself, “THIS IS A FANTASY CREATED BY A MARKETING DEPARTMENT AND AN ADVERTISING AGENCY. THOSE CREATORS ARE EXPERTS IN KNOWING WHAT EMOTIONALLY APPEALS TO PEOPLE. THEY ACTUALLY KNOW NOTHING ABOUT HOW THE COMPANY DOES BUSINESS. AND THE PEOPLE ON THE SCREEN ARE ACTORS. THIS IS A LIE”

Tired of being lied to? Move your money to a local bank or credit union.

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